A Climate Emergency Calls for a Green New Deal (Not a Pipeline)

By Laura Cameron

I feel like I’m living in two alternate realities. On the one hand, governments in Canada and around the world are heeding the voices of the youngest and most vulnerable communities and have declared a state of emergency on climate change, pledging to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to meet the Paris Agreement targets.

Time to move forward with respect

By Marcel Hardisty

First published in the Winnipeg Free Press June 5, 2019

For the last 100 days Camp Morningstar has nurtured a sacred fire on Hollow Water First Nation traditional territory in order to provide balanced information to counter the one-sided proposals and outdated scientific research presented by Canadian Premium Sand (CPS). We have been silenced, lost our jobs, and ignored, but we are still here.

Why Strong Manitoba School Boards Matter

Notwithstanding discussions and concerns about recent provincial Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and Pan-Canadian Assessment Program (PCAP) test scores, or the importance of always looking for improvement, Manitoba has a high quality public school sys­tem that is the envy of most other jurisdictions around the world. Two touchstones of this sys­tem, we argue, are: (i) a vision of the purpose of schooling as fundamentally educational and in­clusive; and (ii) a structure that values and nur­tures professional expertise within a framework of public responsibility and accountability.  READ FULL REPORT HEREBy Jon Young and Dick Henley

MB Liquor Between Rock and Hard Place

By Lynne Fernandez

The issuance of mandate letters to provincial crown corporations has put management and staff on notice, warning that “the old way of doing things” is over.

The preamble for all the letters is the same, with claims that this government is committed to “prudent fiscal management, creating jobs, improving health care and education” etc. etc. Each letter then spells out the specific changes the government expects each crown to make.

New Manitoba Housing Data

Cutting Access Program funding is bad for Manitoba

By Christine Rossman

First published by CBC Online May 11, 2019

Getting ahead is becoming virtually impossible for people in severe financial need who want to go back to school and turn their life around. Last year the Manitoba government terminated 210 Provincial Access Bursaries valued at $1.5 million dollars. Access students who need financial support the most to finish up their degrees are now not receiving it. In addition, the Access program was cut by an additional $1 million.

Education reviews must focus on kids

By Erika Shaker

In January, Manitoba’s education minister Kelvin Goertzen announced the creation of a commission to review the provincial school system and propose a ‘“renewed vision for kindergarten to Grade 12 education,” to “ignite change” to existing systems, structures and programs’.

The changing nature of social housing in Manitoba

By Sarah Cooper

What makes social housing ‘social’? In part, social housing is different from private-market housing because it intentionally provides low-cost housing for low-income households. But it is also a way of taking housing out of the market. It’s a way of keeping housing affordable, and of stabilizing housing as shelter, by removing the potential for speculation. And, it is provided collectively through community-based organizations and government programs, and funded collectively through taxes and government spending.

It is time to stop contracting Transit Plus out

By Carlos Sosa, Zach Fleisher, and Sara Atnikov

First published in the Winnipeg Free Press April 12, 2019

For years, an open secret in Winnipeg has been the poor quality of service associated with Transit Plus (previously Handi-Transit), which exists to provide a parallel Winnipeg Transit for those with disabilities. The service provides transportation to approximately 7,500 people a year. Due to problems with the services, the Independent Living Resource Centre (ILRC) was able to, with the assistance of the Public Interest Law Centre (PILC), submit a complaint to the Manitoba Ombudsman.

Changes in practices necessary, if serious about reconciliation

By Anne Lindsey

Offer money to leaders in a cash-poor community to gain support for a resource extraction project. Publicly shun and disenfranchise individuals who don’t agree. Deceive people into signing their support without full information. Divide the community. Commence destructive preparation of the project site before proper decision-making processes are complete…Situate this project on traditional indigenous territory.